Home » An Essay on the Treatment and Conversion of African Slaves in the British Sugar Colonies (1784) by James H. Ramsay
An Essay on the Treatment and Conversion of African Slaves in the British Sugar Colonies (1784) James H. Ramsay

An Essay on the Treatment and Conversion of African Slaves in the British Sugar Colonies (1784)

James H. Ramsay

Published January 1st 2009
ISBN : 9781104032364
Hardcover
320 pages
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 About the Book 

Excerpt from An Essay on the Treatment and Conversion of African Slaves in the British Sugar ColoniesA Letter of an ordinary length, in answer to the humane one which is here subjoined, gave beginning to this performance. By frequent transcription,MoreExcerpt from An Essay on the Treatment and Conversion of African Slaves in the British Sugar ColoniesA Letter of an ordinary length, in answer to the humane one which is here subjoined, gave beginning to this performance. By frequent transcription, it sensibly increased in size, and extended itself to collateral subjects, till it had become something like a system for the regulation and improvement of our sugar colonies, and the advancement and conversion of their slaves.On submitting the manuscript to those, who were much better judges than the author could pretend to be, of the present prevailing taste (and many persons of rank and learning have honoured it with a perusal) the account of the treatment of slaves in our colonies engaged their sympathy, and the plan for their improvement and conversion had their hearty good wishes.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.